Noteworthy achievements 2009

Bren School faculty, students and research initiatives are some of the most well regarded successes on the UC Irvine campus. We are pleased to announce the following noteworthy achievements for 2009.

Be sure to subscribe to the Bren School's RSS (Really Simple Syndication) feed to get noteworthy news, press releases and articles about the Bren School delivered directly to your desktop!

Awards, grants and other honors can be sent to icsnews@ics.uci.edu to be considered for publication.


DECEMBER 2009

Tsudik and Uzun awarded Google Research Award

photo: gene tsudik

Gene
Tsudik

Gene Tsudik and Ersin Uzun (PhD Candidate, Netsys Program) have been awarded a Google Research Award for $50,000 for a research effort entitled "Secure and Usable Group Association of Personal Wireless Devices."

The goal of this research is to come up, and experiment with, scalable, and usable techniques for spontaneous *secure* association among a group of wireless devices and gadgets. The group device association problem arises whenever a set of individuals, each "armed" with a personal wireless device, want to set up a common secure communication channel for the purpose of a short-term meeting or a longer-term collaboration. It also figures prominently in emergency response and law enforcement settings.

This project dovetails from a larger NSF-funded project (jointly with Professor Alfred Kobsa) on secure and usable association of wireless devices.

Tsudik's research interests are mainly in computer/network security, privacy and applied cryptography. His recent work focuses on privacy in Internet services, RFID systems and mobile ad hoc networks, as well as security in sensor networks and storage systems. His research also covers secure group communication, in particular, group key agreement, group signatures and group access control.


Tsudik appointed Cor Wit Chair

photo: gene tsudik

Gene
Tsudik

Gene Tsudik, professor of computer science, has been appointed Cor Wit Chair at Delft University of Technology in the Netherlands.

Established in 2003 by the Cor Wit Foundation, the Cor Wit chair is awarded annually to international researchers in the field of telecommunications and computer systems whose research focuses on the interface of technology and society. Gene Tsudik's core research is in Network Security & Privacy with emphasis on cryptographic protocols in the context of wireless, sensor and mobile ad hoc networks.

Recipients are invited to work in the Telecommunications Department of the Faculty Electrical Engineering, Mathematics and Computer Science (EEMCS) at Delft University of Technology.

Associate Dean Magda El Zarki was previously appointed Cor Wit chair in 2006.

Tsudik's research interests are mainly in computer/network security, privacy and applied cryptography. His recent work focuses on privacy in Internet services, RFID systems and mobile ad hoc networks, as well as security in sensor networks and storage systems. His research also covers secure group communication, in particular, group key agreement, group signatures and group access control.


NOVEMBER 2009

Lopes speaks at Intel CTO keynote address

photo: Prof. Cristina Lopes (UCI, Informatics), Justin Rattner  (CTO Intel)

Prof. Cristina Lopes (UCI, Informatics), Justin Rattner (CTO Intel)

Cristina Lopes, Associate Professor of Informatics participated as a guest speaker in the keynote address at SuperComputing '09 in Portland Oregon. The Keynote was delivered by Justin Rattner, CTO of Intel. Lopes was a guest at Rattner's keynote, in her role as one of the main architects of OpenSim.

Justin Rattner's opening keynote address at SuperComputing'09 message addressed how the super-computing industry has stagnated, and the only thing that will save it from collapse is a drastic change on what people think of as "super-computing." Other guests were Aaron Duffy, a biology researcher at Utah State University, and Shenlei Winkler, CEO of the Fashion Design Institute.

Lopes' research is related to languages and communication systems. The ultimate goal of her research is to deepen the knowledge about communication, in particular in systems that involve humans and machines. With this utopic goal in mind, she has done work in a variety of fields such as programming languages, security and applications of audio signal processing.


Navarro, Van der Hoek win Premier Award for SimSe

Project scientist Emily Navarro and Associate Dean André van der Hoek have been recognized with the 2009 Premier Award for SimSE, a game-based educational software engineering simulation environment that allows students to practice "virtual" software engineering processes in a graphical, interactive and fun setting.

SimSE's direct, graphical feedback enables students to learn the complex cause and effect relationships underlying software engineering processes. During the game, the student takes on the role of the project manager and directs engineers to perform typical process tasks.

SimSE helps bridge the gap between the conceptual knowledge about software engineering that is presented in lecture but that often times is not fully explored or practiced in assignments or projects.

SimSE includes a customizable modeling environment that allows instructors to create new scenarios, application domains, organizations and cultures. SimSE has been used worldwide and has been found to be an educationally effective tool that increases students' understanding of software engineering process concepts.

Van der Hoek's research focuses on understanding and advancing the role of design, coordination, and education in software engineering. He has authored and co-authored over 80 peer-reviewed journal and conference publications, and in 2006 was a recipient of an ACM SIGSOFT Distinguished Paper Award. He is a co-author of the 2005 Configuration Management Impact Report as well as the 2007 Futures of Software Engineering Report on Software Design and Architecture.


ICS Alum and UT Faculty Arthur Reyes Passes

photo:

Arthur
Reyes

Arthur Reyes, Ph.D. '99 died unexpectedly this week in Arlington, Texas. He was a faculty member in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering at the University of Texas Arlington.

Reyes was a software engineering student under Dean Debra J. Richardson. Details regarding his funeral services will be made available at the UTA website.

 


OCTOBER 2009

Southern California Computer Vision Meet-Up brings over 80 local researchers to UC Irvine

On October 30, 2009, the Computational Vision group at UC Irvine hosted the second annual Southern California Computer Vision Meetup, a day of talks and discussion on the latest results in computer vision. Topics of discussion ranged from surveillance and automotive safety, to differentiating white blood cells by qualitatively analyzing a single image.

Over 80 researchers attended the day-long event, including faculty and students from UC Irvine, USC, UC Riverside, UCLA, UC San Diego, and Caltech, as well as researchers from JPL, Google and Evolution Robotics.

The Computational Vision Lab studies computational vision, seeking to understand both the information processing capabilities of biological visual systems and develop computer vision systems. Researchers are interested in theoretical questions as well as practical applications ranging from motion capture to biological image analysis.

For more information about Computer Vision at UCI, visit: http://vision.ics.uci.edu/.


Majumder, Sajadi receive paper award at IEEE Visualization

photo: Aditi Majumder

Aditi
Majumder

A paper entitled, "Markerless View-Independent Registration of Multiple Distorted Projectors on Extruded Surfaces Using an Uncalibrated Camera" by Computer Science professor Aditi Majumder and graduate student Behzad Sajadi has won the runner up in the Best Paper Award at the IEEE Visualization 2009 conference held in Atlantic City this month.

The paper presents the first algorithm to geometrically register multiple projectors in a view-independent manner on a common type of curved surface, vertically extruded surface, using an uncalibrated camera without attaching any obtrusive markers to the display screen. This simple markerless registration has the potential to have a large impact on easy set-up and maintenance of large curved multi-projector displays, common for visualization, edutainment, training and simulation applications.

IEEE Visualization is the premier annual forum for visualization advances for academia, government, and industry. This event brings together researchers and practitioners with a shared interest in visualization tools, techniques, and technology.

Majumder's research addresses how to produce a seamless image on a large-scale tiled display - an important problem to both the scientific and entertainment fields. She has developed a suite of mathematical models, methods and software to correct the geometric and color variations that arise when tiling multiple projection displays.


Kobsa named Associate Editor of new ACM journal

photo: Alfred Kobsa

Alfred
Kobsa

Informatics Professor Alfred Kobsa has been appointed Associate Editor of the new "ACM Transactions on Intelligent Interactive Systems" (TIIS). The journal will publish research articles concerning the design, realization, and/or evaluation of interactive systems that exhibit some form of "intelligent" behavior.

The Journal's focus will be on sensing and perception, knowledge representation and reasoning, learning, creativity, planning, autonomous motion and manipulation, natural language processing, and social interaction.

Kobsa's research lies in the areas of user modeling and personalized systems (with applications in the areas of information environments, expert finders, and user interfaces for disabled and elderly people), privacy, and in information visualization.

He is also the editor of "User Modeling and User-Adapted Interaction: The Journal of Personalization Research", edited several books and authored numerous publications in the areas of user-adaptive systems, human-computer interaction and knowledge representation.


Fowlkes, Ramanan and Desai awarded Marr Prize in Kyoto, Japan

photo: Charless Fowlkes

Charless
Fowlkes


photo: Deva Ramanan

Deva
Ramanan

A paper entitled "Discriminative models for multi-class object layout" by PhD student Chaitanya Desai and Assistant Professors Deva Ramanan and Charless Fowlkes received the Marr Prize at the International Conference on Computer Vision (ICCV) held the first week of October in Kyoto, Japan.

The prize is awarded to the best paper at ICCV and is considered one of the top honors in computer vision. The award is named after David Marr, a theoretical neuroscientist who made profound contributions to the theory of both human and machine vision in the 1970's.

The paper describes research on a new approach to modeling contextual relations between objects in an image (e.g. bottles are often seen resting on top of tables but not the other way around). The system automatcially learns these relations from example images and uses this information to outperform existing approaches to object detection.

Fowlkes' research is in computational vision, both in understanding the information processing capabilities of the human visual system and in developing machine vision systems. He is also interested in applying computer vision techniques to automating the analysis of biological data and developing algorithmic tools for understanding morphology and spatial aspects of gene expression.

Ramanan's research interests span computer vision, machine learning, and computer graphics. His past work focused on the analysis of human movement from video, including tracking people and recognizing their actions. Current interests include object recognition, large-scale image/video processing, structured-prediction approaches to learning, and activity recognition.


SEPTEMBER 2009

Dourish receives $500,000 grant for social networking study in Kazakhstan, Russia

photo:  paul dourish

Paul
Dourish

Paul Dourish, Professor of Informatics, has received a $500,000 National Foundation Grant for his research entitle "From Local Ties to Transnational Connections: The Role of Computer-mediated Communication in Relational Maintenance." The research is in collaboration with Irina Shklovski, an assistant professor at the IT University in Copenhagen, Denmark, and formerly a post-doc at the Bren School.

The focus of the grant is a study of the use of social networking software and web sites in Kazakhstan and Russia, looking at the cultural specificities of information technology use.

The research investigates the ways culturally embedded expectations of personal networks shape the use of social network sites and other Internet-based social applications for relational maintenance. Dourish and Shklovski will also explore the way people reconnect with contacts that relocate to other cities and, more often, other countries and how such connections may define new transnational forms of belonging.

Dourish's primary research interests are in the areas of Computer-Supported Cooperative Work, Human-Computer Interaction, and Ubiquitous Computing. He is especially interested in the foundational relationships between social scientific analysis and technological design.


Eppstein wins best paper award at WADS

photo: andre van der hoek

David
Eppstein

A paper by computer science professor David Eppstein and former ICS student Kevin A. Wortman, "Optimal Embedding into Star Metrics," has received the best paper award from the 11th Algorithms and Data Structures Symposium (WADS), held this August in Banff, Canada.

Their research concerns algorithms for choosing the location of a central facility such as an airline hub in order to minimize the increase in distance caused by traveling through the hub instead of taking a direct route. The WADS best paper award was announced on the conference web site after the conference was held, and comes with a prize of 500 Euro in books from Springer-Verlag.

Eppstein's research interests are varied and include geometric optimization, finite element mesh generation and mesh improvement, information visualization and graph drawing, robust statistics and estimation of web-graph properties, graph theory and graph algorithms, exponential-time algorithms for NP-hard problems, and cellular automata and combinatorial games.


SCONCE students Uzun and Wang named UCI Graduate Dean's Dissertation Fellows

Secure Computing & Networking Center (SCONCE) Ph.D. candidates Ersin Uzun and Yang Wang have been awarded the UCI Graduate Dean's Dissertation Fellowship for Fall 2009.

They are among only 25 recipients campus-wide. This fellowship frees students from non-research related employment, allowing them focus on completion of their dissertations.

Uzun's research focuses on usable security and Wang's research revolves around balancing privacy and personalization.


Franz receives $600,000 NSF CyberTrust Grant

photo: andre van der hoek

Michael
Franz

Michael Franz, Professor of Computer Science, has received a $600,000 grant from the National Science Foundation's CyberTrust program. His project with co-PI Cormac Flanagan from UC Santa Cruz will investigate next-generation infrastructure for trustworthy web applications.

Many services traditionally performed by stand-alone programs running on desktop computers are being migrated to "Web 2.0" applications, remote services that reside "in the cloud" and are that accessed through a browser. This migration process offers a unique opportunity to re-engineer the way that software is constructed, adding some extra capabilities that reduce the vulnerability of the global information infrastructure to problems such as viruses, cyber-attacks, loss of privacy, and integrity violations.

With this goal in mind, this project designs and implements a next-generation infrastructure for trustworthy web applications. It evolves the existing Web 2.0 technologies into a more trustworthy "Web 2.Sec" version by introducing information-labeling and strong information-flow controls pervasively at the service provider, at the user's end, and on all paths in between.

A key feature of the new Web 2.Sec architecture is that all application programs are executed on top of a virtual machine (VM) rather than directly on physical hardware. Hence the VM retains full control over the data at all times, allowing it to enforce information-þow policies that guarantee conÞdentiality and integrity. Even a malicious or faulty program running on top of the Web 2.Sec VM cannot cause any action that would violate these policies.

Franz is an expert on virtual machines, mobile-code security, and dynamic compilation. He is the co-inventor (with a graduate student) of the Trace Compilation method that now drives JavaScript performance in Mozilla's Firefox browser. He has graduated 13 Ph.D. students, been awarded more than $7 Million in competitive Federal research funding as Principal Investigator, and has published more than 90 refereed papers.


Van der Hoek receives NSF grant for the improvement of software design education

photo: andre van der hoek

André van
der Hoek

Associate Dean André van der Hoek has received a $500,000 National Science Foundation grant to research software design education, specifically to understand and innovate tool support, design exercises and course modules for sketch-based design practice and reflection.

Van der Hoek's research will take an introspective look at the process by which a student or group of students arrive at a final software design. He hopes to delve into the alternatives students consider, as well as the thought processes students go through before arriving at a final product. His project will observe actual software designers in
action and implement a tool for creative, sketch-based software design, and migrate to a studio-based approach to software design education.

Through this research, van der Hoek hopes to enable students to gain a broader and deeper understanding of software design, and provide
instructors with an enhanced portfolio of teaching methods.

Van der Hoek's research focuses on understanding and advancing the role of design, coordination, and education in software engineering. He has authored and co-authored over 80 peer-reviewed journal and conference publications, and in 2006 was a recipient of an ACM SIGSOFT Distinguished Paper Award. He is a co-author of the 2005 Configuration Management Impact Report as well as the 2007 Futures of Software Engineering Report on Software Design and Architecture.

Van der Hoek was honored, in 2005, as UC Irvine Professor of the Year for his outstanding and innovative educational contributions.


Goodrich, Kobsa and Tsudik awarded $300,000 NSF grant to study Usable Location Privacy

photo: michael goodrich

Michael
Goodrich


photo: alfred kobsa

Alfred
Kobsa


photo: gene tsudik

Gene
Tsudik

Computer Science Professors Michael Goodrich, Alfred Kobsa and Gene Tsudik have been awarded $300,000 by the National Science Foundation for research on Usable Location Privacy in Geo-Social Networks.

The project will explore the usability, feasibility, and scalability of preserving privacy and securing location-aware geo-social networking platforms on mobile devices, such as Google Latitude. The research group is basing their project on a belief that security and privacy can best be incorporated with usability at the beginning of its design.

The research will focus on the usability of privacy-agile secure location-based communication and supporting protocols that scale to large numbers of users and accommodate various privacy levels suitable for different application domains.

This project envisions a wide range of future applications, with three unifying factors: (1) geo-social undertone, i.e., applications that combine social groups and locality, (2) lack of, or need to avoid using, fixed infrastructure facilities, and (3) need for both security and privacy.

Goodrich's research is directed at the design of high-performance algorithms and data structures for solving large-scale problems surrounding the increased demands of computer graphics, information visualization, scientific data analysis, information assurance and security, and the Internet. He also is interested in computer science education, specifically ways of more effectively teaching data structures and algorithms.

Kobsa's research lies in the areas of user modeling and personalized systems (with applications in the areas of information environments, expert finders, and user interfaces for disabled and elderly people), privacy, and in information visualization.

Tsudik's research interests are mainly in computer/network security, privacy and applied cryptography. His recent work focuses on privacy in Internet services, RFID systems and mobile ad hoc networks, as well as security in sensor networks and storage systems. His research also covers secure group communication, in particular, group key agreement, group signatures and group access control.

 


AUGUST 2009

Professor Jordan receives $500,000 NSF grant for Internet architecture and public policy integration

photo: jscott jordan

Scott
Jordan

Professor of Computer Science Scott Jordan has received a $500,000 National Science Foundation grant to incorporate telecommunications policy and economics into the Internet architecture.

“As a result of technical, economic and public policy forces, the Internet's original design principles – layering and end-to-end – are increasingly violated,” says Jordan.

Currently, Internet Service Providers (ISPs) are deploying quality of service mechanisms, but only allowing their use for certain applications sold to their own subscribers. Some ISPs have used deep packet inspection techniques to implement traffic management practices that throttle or block peer-to-peer applications.

Professor Jordan hopes to counteract this deterioration by proposing an interdisciplinary approach that updates the Internet architectural principles to account for telecommunications policy and economics.

The project will identify the flaws of the end-to-end and layering models that are not withstanding the technical, economic, and legal forces upon networking. The project aims to modify these models so that they promote good technical design, respond appropriately to economic pressures, and encourage societally beneficial outcomes.

To validate these new models, Professor Jordan plans to illustrate their potential use by applying them to three case studies – net neutrality, traffic management, and Quality of Service.

Professor Jordan is also developing an undergraduate course on “The Internet and Public Policy”. This research will help bridge the gulf that exists between communication lawmakers and networking researchers by informing staff members in the United States Congress about the technical aspects of telecommunication issues, and by developing an architectural framework for the networking research community to help them consider impacts of network economics and law.

Professor Jordan’s research interests currently include pricing and differentiated services in the Internet, resource allocation in wireless multimedia networks, and telecommunications policy.


Franz, Tsudik take part in National Cyber Leap Year Summit

photo: michael franz

Michael
Franz


photo: chen li

Gene
Tsudik

Professors of Computer Science Michael Franz and Gene Tsudik took part in the National Cyber Leap Year Summit (NCLY), organized by the Networking and Information Technology Research and Development (NITRD) Program. Tsudik served as the co-chair of the Digital Provenance group, which addressed the issue of basing trust decisions on verified assertions. The summit was held August 17-19 in Washington, D.C.

NITRD is the Nation's primary source of Federally funded revolutionary breakthroughs in advanced information technologies such as computing, networking, and software.

The National Cyber Leap Year initiative is the result of the call from The White House Office of Science and Technology to secure our nation's cyber infrastructure. NCLY take a complementary approach to the traditional methodology of solving cybersecurity problems, which researches better solutions to current issues. Instead, NCLY attempts to change the cybsersecurity game to shift focus onto new problems that are on the horizon.

Franz is an expert on virtual machines, mobile-code security, and dynamic compilation. He is the co-inventor (with a graduate student) of the Trace Compilation method that now drives JavaScript performance in Mozilla's Firefox browser. He has graduated 13 Ph.D. students, been awarded more than $7 Million in competitive Federal research funding as Principal Investigator, and has published more than 90 refereed papers.

Tsudik's research interests are mainly in computer/network security, privacy and applied cryptography. His recent work focuses on privacy in Internet services, RFID systems and mobile ad hoc networks, as well as security in sensor networks and storage systems. His research also covers secure group communication, in particular, group key agreement, group signatures and group access control.


Utts receives the American Statistical Association Founder's Award

photo: jessica utts

Jessica
Utt
s

Professor of statistics, Jessica Utts, received the American Statistical Association (ASA) Founder Award, the organization's highest honor, at the 2009 Joint Statistical Meetings held August 1 - 6 in Washington, DC.

Utts, along with four other recipients, were selected based on their service over an extended period of time and in a variety of leadership roles, including chapter, section, committee, officer or editorial activities, in which effective service or leadership was provided within ASA or on behalf of ASA to other organizations.

Utts was chosen based on her leadership on many ASA committees and the Statistical Education and Bayesian Statistical Science Sections; for extraordinary service in the development of the ASA’s strategic plan; for editorial service to the American Statistician and to the Journal of the American Statistical Association; and for her outstanding commitment to the profession through leaderships roles in AAAS, CAUSE, COPSS, NISS and WNAR.

Utts’ research interests include statistics education and applications of statistics to a variety of areas, most notably parapsychology, medicine, and transportation. She is the recipient of two distinguished teaching awards, the author of three statistics textbooks with an emphasis on statistical literacy, and the editor-in-chief of an online statistics course.


JULY 2009

Dutt, Nicolau and Veidenbaum Receive Best Paper Award at IJCNN 2009

photo: nikil dutt

Nikil
Dutt


photo: alexandru nicolau

Alexandru
Nicolau


photo: alexander veidenbaum

Alexander
Veidenbaum

Computer Science Professors Nikil Dutt, Alexandru Nicolau, and Alexander Veidenbaum have been recognized with a Best Paper Award at the 2009 International Joint Conference on Neural Networks (IJCNN).

An interdisciplinary collaboration, the paper entitled “Efficient Simulation of Large-Scale Spiking Neural Networks Using CUDA Graphics Processors” was also co-authored by Computer Science Ph.D. students Jayram Moornikara and Assistant Professor of Cognitive Science Jeffrey Krichmar.

The paper describes new techniques for parallelization of spiking neural network models of the brain and their efficient realization on emerging graphics processor platforms. This will enable close-to-real-time simulation of realistic networks of nerve cells and could have many practical applications.

IJCNN is the premier international conference in the area of neural networks theory, analysis and applications.

Dutt is a Chancellor’s Professor whose research interests lie in the area of embedded systems and computer-aided design, with a specific focus on the exploration, evaluation and design of domain-specific embedded systems spanning both software and hardware. Other projects within his group include low-power/low-energy compilation and synthesis, validation and verification of embedded systems, software/hardware interfaces for distributed embedded systems, memory architecture exploration for embedded systems, and brain-inspired architectures and computing.

Nicolau's work is in the design and implementations of a system of program transformations that support the semi-automatic (and eventually fully-automatic) exploitation of substantially all the parallelism available in a given program. Nicolau is also interested in developing a tool for the rigorous study and development of parallelizing compilers.

Veidenbaum's research is in the areas of computer architecture, embedded systems, and compilers. He investigates new ways to build faster processors and systems and to reduce their power consumption and cost.


Tomlinson awarded NSF EAGER Grant to study interactive media for childhood environmental awareness

photo: bill tomlinson

Bill
Tomlinson

Bill Tomlinson, professor of informatics, has been awarded a $280,371 Early-Concept Grant for Exploratory Research (EAGER) for his project which will utilize narrative-centered computing (NCC) to allow children to see how their own behavior can cause positive or negative changes in a story ecosystem.

Unlike traditional computational storytelling that utilizes a linear “filmstrip”, NCC framework begins with a new mechanism for computational storytelling called spatiotemporal anchoring. Spatiotemporally anchored stories consist of a network of story nodes in which each node depicts a small element of the overall plot, and is anchored to a specific location in space and time.

To advance the story users explore a rich geographical representation of the relevant spatiotemporal locale, discovering story nodes and the interconnections between them. Because nodes can be anchored at variable levels of spatiotemporal resolution and interlinked in non-linear ways, exploring these narratives will help children to develop more nuanced abilities for reasoning about distributed causation and variable scale. These abilities, in turn, will translate into more effective engagement with environmental issues.

The EAGER program is intended to support exploratory work in its early stages on untested, but potentially transformative, research ideas or approaches, therefore the grant will go toward funding the creation of a testbed interactive narrative, to be deployed online and as a temporary science museum exhibit. This narrative will use spatiotemporal anchoring along with video and traditional cinematographic techniques to dramatize the interactions that take place within a representative California ecosystem, for example, a marine environment in which sea otters, kelp forests, and sea urchins all interact.

Tomlinson's research deals with the social impacts of information technologies, in particular regarding environmental issues and interactive education systems. His previous contributions to informatics and computer science are significant in human-computer interaction, interactive animation, autonomous agents, and multi-device systems.


JUNE 2009

Jarecki awarded Distinguished Assistant Professor Award for Research

photo: stanislaw jarecki

Stanislaw
Jarecki

Stanislaw Jarecki, assistant professor of computer science, has been awarded the annual UC Irvine Distinguished Assistant Professor Award for Research. It is the first time a Bren School professor has received the award.

The recipient of the award must be nominated by his or her peers and have made significant contributions through research and/or other creative activity that has had a major impact on their field, either through a career-long record of contributions, or as a result of a major contribution.

The award includes a $3,000 prize and an invitation to give a campuswide lecture on his research topic in the fall quarter.

Jarecki’s research in cryptography and computer security has attracted funding from a variety of sources including the very selective National Science Foundation (NSF) Cybertrust Program as well as from the Intelligence Advance Research Funding Agency (IARPA).

In 2008, Jarecki received a $450,000 Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) award from the NSF for his proposed research, Secure Multi-Party Protocols, from Feasibility to Practice, which has a goal of designing cryptographic algorithms for a variety of secure tasks. The CAREER award is the NSF's most prestigious award for newer faculty. The program supports early career development of teacher-scholars who are most likely to become the academic leaders of the future.


Congratulations 2008-09 Bren School Honors recipients!

photo:: award

Students on this list received awards for latin honors, Phi Beta Kappa, Campuswide Honors, Outstanding Contribution to Research and others. Final latin honors recipients will be determined once Spring quarter grades are processed in to the final g.p.a. calculation.

Note for students on this list: please pick up your cord and/or stole from Neha at the ICS Student Affairs Office.


MAY 2009

Tomlinson received Environment Institute Grant, Support from Urban Water Research Center

photo: Bill Tomlinson

Bill
Tomlinson

Bill Tomlinson, Professor of Informatics, along with Professors Brett Sanders and Robin Keller have received a $38,000 grant from the Environment Institute at UC Irvine to support a new project entitled “Using IT to Compress Perceived Time and Space in How People Think About Global Change: A Step Towards Behavioral Change”.

This interdisciplinary research collaboration is also being supported in part from a $10,000 contribution from the Urban Water Research Center at UC Irvine. Sanders and Keller are respectively professors at The Henry Samueli School of Engineering and The Paul Merage School of Business.

The research collaboration will study the difficulties people have in engaging with environmental issues, in part because global change occurs on scales of time and space that are relatively large compared to the usual scope of human decision making. People respond enthusiastically to fast-acting disasters such as fires and earthquakes, but less so to issues that occur more gradually over many years, even when the consequences are far greater.

To date, there has been little research on how to connect long-term global environmental change to human scales of time and space in a systematic way, thereby enabling behavioral change. Tomlinson et al’s research will focus on the science and public perception of sea level rise.

Tomlinson's research deals with the social impacts of information technologies, in particular regarding environmental issues and interactive education systems. His previous contributions to informatics and computer science are significant in human-computer interaction, interactive animation, autonomous agents, and multi-device systems.

More about the Environment Institute at UC Irvine: http://environment.uci.edu/

More about the Urban Water Research Center at UC Irvine: http://www.uwrc.uci.edu/


Olson gives keynote talks on Scientific Collaboration and Science Collaboratories

photo: Gary Olson

Gary
Olson

Gary Olson, Bren Professor of Information and Computer Sciences will give two keynote talks at the University of Siegen in Germany, and the 2009 International Symposium on Collaborative Technologies and Systems.

Earlier this month, Olson gave a keynote entitled "Scientific Collaboration on the Internet", at the conference on Enhancing Humanities: Potentials of Media and ICT in the Humanities, held at the University of Siegen in Germany.

In 1989 a small group of pioneering thinkers, led by Joshua Lederberg and William Wulf, sketched out a vision of what has come to be known by various names, such as collaboratories, eScience, and cyberscience.

In the several decades since then many such projects have emerged in almost all areas of science. But there has been a complex pattern of success and failure in such efforts. Olson and his colleagues have spent nearly a decade studying these projects, trying to figure out what accounts for the pattern of success and failure in them. In his talk he reviewed lessons learned, and where he hopes to go with further research in the area.

The current understanding from this investigation was recently summarized in a book entitled "Scientific Collaboration on the Internet" (MIT Press, 2008).

This week in Baltimore, Olson will give a keynote entited "The Next Generation of Science Collaboratories". Olson will also talk about how the changing technical scene opens new opportunities for the next generation of collaboratories, as well as the sociotechnical factors that distinguish successful from unsuccessful collaboratories.

Collaboratories to support scientific research have been around for at least two decades, and have emerged as an important form of cyberinfrastructure to enable ever more ambitious geographically distributed research projects. A broadened view of what a collaboratory is suggests there are a variety of kinds of functions they could support.

Early collaboratories were often rather narrow in focus, but some have broadened to mimic fully-functional laboratories. Furthermore, will almost all early collaboratories were in the physical and biological sciences, by now they have emerged as serious research infrastructure in most domains, including the social sciences and humanities.

Olson’s latest research focuses on how to support small groups of people working on difficult intellectual tasks, particularly when the members of the group are geographically distributed. This research has involved both field studies of groups attempting to do such work and lab studies that evaluate specific technologies. He is one of four Donald Bren Professors of Information and Computer Sciences at the Bren School.


Dourish in Taiwan for Service Science Workshop on Qualitative Field Research in Organizations

photo: Prof. Fu-Ren Lin, director of the Institute for Service Science at National Tsing Hua University, Calvin Morrill (UCI, Sociology), Martha Feldman (UCI, Planing Policy and Design),  Prof Chintay Shih, Dean of the College of Technology Management, National Sting Hua University, and Paul Dourish (UCI, Informatics).

Prof. Fu-Ren Lin, director of the Institute for Service Science at National Tsing Hua University, Calvin Morrill (UCI, Sociology), Martha Feldman (UCI, Planing Policy and Design), Prof Chintay Shih, Dean of the College of Technology Management, National Sting Hua University, and Paul Dourish (UCI, Informatics).

Paul Dourish, Professor of Informatics, along with UCI Professors Calvin Morrill (Sociology) and Martha Feldman (Planning, Policy, and Design) were recently in Taiwan presenting workshops at National Tsing Hau University in Hsinchu, and at National Sun Yat-Sen University in Kaohsiung.

The three-day workshop presentsed exemplars and strategies for doing qualitative field research in organizations. The activities of the workshop were divided into three areas: 1) introducing the background and roles of qualitative methods in the research of workshop leaders and participants; 2) introducing methodological issues and exercises in qualitative field research; and 3) discussion and feedback on workshop participants’ qualitative research experiences and goals.

Dourish's primary research interests are in the areas of Computer-Supported Cooperative Work, Human-Computer Interaction, and Ubiquitous Computing. He is especially interested in the foundational relationships between social scientific analysis and technological design. More about Dourish can be found on the Web.


APRIL 2009

Judy Olson gives talk on social ergonomics at CHI 2009

photo: Judy Olson

Judy
Olson

Judy Olson, Bren Professor of Information and Computer Sciences, gave the plenary opening at Computer-Human Interaction (CHI) 2009. Olson's talk, Even Small Distance Matters: Social Ergonomics in Collocated and Remote Teams, focused on the study of social ergonomics, the design of workplaces and systems that fit the natural social capabilities and inclinations of workers and users.

Olson reviewed some of the highlights of what is known about natural social capabilities and inclinations, showed how they play out in both “radically collocated” teamwork and remote teamwork before finishing with a set of guidelines for everyone to use when having to work either collocated or remotely.

CHI is the premier worldwide forum for exchanging information on all aspects of how people interact with computers. CHI 2009 ran from April 4-9, in Boston, MA offering two days of pre-conference workshops and four days of dynamic sessions that explored the future of computer-human interaction with researchers, practitioners, educators and students.

More than 2000 professionals from over 40 countries attended this year's conference, which marked 27 years of research, innovation and development of the Computer-Human Interaction community.

Olson has published about 110 peer-reviewed research articles and is best known for her work on distance collaborations and has achieved international acclaim for her studies that compared office workers in geographically distributed organizations to those working in the same location.


Tsudik to give keynote on secure device pairing at IPSEC 2009

photo: gene tsudik

Gene
Tsudik

Professor of Computer Science Gene Tsudik will be giving an invited keynote talk entitled "Secure and Usable Device Pairing" at the 5th Information Security Practice and Experience Conference (ISPEC 2009) to be held April 13-15, 2009, in Xi’an, China.

“Secure Device Pairing” is the process of bootstrapping a secure channel between two or more previously unassociated personal devices over a (usually wireless) human-imperceptible communication channel. Lack of prior security context and absence of common trust infrastructure open the door for so-called "Man-in-the-Middle" (or "Evil Twin") attacks. Mitigation of these attacks requires user involvement in the device pairing process.

Tsudik’s talk will summarize notable secure device pairing techniques, comparing and contrasting their advantages, shortcomings and limitations, followed by the first comprehensive and comparative evaluation of these methods.

ISPEC is an annual conference that brings together researchers and practitioners to provide a confluence of new information security technologies, their applications and their integration with IT systems in various vertical sectors. More information about ISPEC can be found at the Conference Web site: http://www.ispec2009.net/.

Tsudik's research interests are mainly in computer/network security, privacy and applied cryptography. His recent work focuses on privacy in Internet services, RFID systems and mobile ad hoc networks, as well as security in sensor networks and storage systems.

His research also covers secure group communication, in particular, group key agreement, group signatures and group access control. He also is interested in database security and public key cryptography.


DuBois awarded National Defense Science and Engineering Fellowship

photo: christopher dubois

Christopher
DuBois

Christopher DuBois, a first-year PhD student in the Department of Statistics, has been awarded a 3-year National Defense Science and Engineering (NDSEG) Graduate Fellowship.

NDSEG Fellowships are awarded based on a national competition, with approximately 200 fellowships awarded each year in the United States to graduate students across a broad range of fields of study in the sciences and engineering.

DuBois will use his fellowship funding to pursue his Ph.D. research on statistical modeling of large dynamic social networks, such as email communication networks between individuals, working with professor Padhraic Smyth in the Departments of Computer Science and Statistics and professor Carter Butts in the Department of Sociology.


Finalists of hITEC entrepreneurship competition announced

photo: idea

Three teams advanced to the finals of hITEC, the Bren School's Technology Entrepreneurship Competition. The finalists also earned a spot in the Stradling Yocca Carlson and Rauth Business Plan Competition sponsored by the Paul Merage School of Business.

The final products, created by Bren School students, with the guidance of a faculty or corporate mentor, span a broad spectrum of uses.

Clarity Labs
Ron Villalon, Niraj Desai, Manjot Bhuller
Mentors: Professor Chen Li, Arie Shen

A product that leverages television viewers interest in the products on their favorite TV shows (clothing, props, etc.) and gives these viewers access to information through tag placement in interactive videos.

Event Viz
Pinaki Sinha, Hamed Pirsiavash, Mingyan Gao
Mentors: Ramesh Jain, Janell So

Web-based software that organizes isolated events and related information, such as documents, photos, audio and video, and creates an organized multimedia chronicle to visualize, access, search, and create customized stories.

Olepta
Nathan Esquenazi and Thomas Shafer
Mentors: Professor Andre van der Hoek, TJ Thinakaran

A relationship management product that provides end-to-end management for communication with patients, and allows doctors and patients to have a continuous relationship using modern communication technologies.

The final competition placing and prizes will be awarded in early June at the ICS Awards Ceremony and Project ICS Showcase.

hITEC is the cornerstone of the Bren School entrepreneurship program. This year, the program was sponsored with generous donations from: Northwind Ventures, Printronix and Ted and Janice Smith.

The competition is designed to foster a spirit of entrepreneurship among Bren School and UC Irvine students, and fuel the development of new technologies that have the potential to positively impact the marketplace.


MARCH 2009

Jain to give talk at the final conference of the European CHORUS

photo: ramesh jain

Ramesh
Jain

Bren Professor Ramesh Jain will be the opening speaker at the final conference of the European CHORUS project on Multimedia Search Engines (MMSE). Jain will speak about state of the art multimedia search technology and its future during a session entitled, "Chorus Roadmap and International perspectives".

CHORUS is a European Coordination Action which aims at creating the conditions of mutual information and cross fertilisation between the European projects dealing with Multimedia Content Search Engines. National and international initiatives are also included in CHORUS action.

Jain is an active researcher in multimedia information systems, image databases, machine vision, and intelligent systems.

CHORUS will be held May 26- 28, 2009 in Brussels, Belgium. More information can be found on the conference Web site.


Carey and Li awarded seed money from UC Discovery Grant and eBay

photo: michael carey

Michael
Carey


photo: chen li

Chen
Li

Computer Science professors Michael Carey and Chen Li have been awarded a total of $132,000 in seed funding in support of their research entitled ASTERIX: A Scalable Platform for XML Information Analysis. The funding is made in part from the UC Discovery Grant ($52,000) and eBay ($80,000).

ASTERIX, which stands for “Active, Scalable, Transactional Enterprise Repository for Information in XML,” is a new effort to develop a scalable semistructured information management system, based on XML and XQuery technologies, targeting very large shared-nothing compute clusters.

A Bren Professor in Information and Computer Sciences, Carey’s research interests are in database systems, information integration, service-oriented computing, middleware, distributed systems, and computer system performance evaluation.

Li's research interests are in the fields of database and information systems, including data integration and sharing, data warehouses, data cleansing, data privacy, and information management on the Web.


Suda named IEEE Distinguished Lecturer

photo: tatsuya suda

Tatsuya
Suda

Computer Science Professor Tatsuya Suda has been named IEEE Communications Society Distinguished Lecturer with a term effective through December 2010. Suda will be lecturing on:

(1) Molecular Communication: New Paradigm for Communication Among Nano-Scale Biological Machines

(2) The Bio-Networking Architecture: A Biologically Inspired Approach to the Design of Computer Networks and Network Applications

(3) New Research Directions in Networks: from Sociology to Biology

The IEEE Distinguished Lecturers are selected to provide a pool of technical experts for lectures by IEEE Chapters and sections. A complete list of Communications Society Distinguished Lecturers are available online.

Suda's research is in computer networks and distributed computing systems; his interests span the entire spectrum from the design and performance evaluation of these systems to their actual implementation.

His current research focuses on applications of biological principles and large complex system principles onto networks, high speed networks, next generation Internet, ATM (Asynchronous Transfer Model) networks, object-oriented distributed systems, and multimedia applications.


Vaisenberg receives first prize at IEEE Percom'09 Ph.D. Forum

photo: ronen vaisenberg

Ronen
Vaisenberg

Third year computer science Ph.D. student, Ronen Vaisenberg has been awarded the first prize at the IEEE International Conference on Pervasive Computing and Communications' (IEEE Percom '09) Ph.D Forum.

The Ph.D. Forum Committee evaluated research projects based on a submitted extended abstract, poster, and discussion at the poster session. Vaisenberg's research was also recognized as the most innovative and/or most promising interdisciplinary research project.

Under the monitorship of Professor Sharad Mehrotra, Vaisenberg's Ph.D dissertation deals with the issues related to the data management support for sentient systems, motivated by real-world emergency-response application needs which are funded by NSF’s ITR-Rescue (RESponding to Crisis and Unexpected Events) and DHS’s Safire (Situational Awareness for Firefighters).

More about Vaisenberg and his research can be found on his Web site.


Chloe Azencott awarded IBM Ph.D. Fellowship

photo: chloe azencott

Chloe
Azencott

Chloe Azencott, fourth year Ph.D. student in computer science has been awarded an IBM Ph.D. Fellowship program for the 2009-2010 academic year. The award which covers tuition and mandatory fees, also comes with a $17,500 stipend.

Azencott's, research interest lies in the areas of machine learning applied to the life sciences, more particularly chemistry and chemoinformatics.

Under the mentorship of faculty advisor Pierre Baldi, Azencott's research topic is entitled Statistical Machine Learning and Data Mining for Chemoinformatics and Drug Discovery.

The IBM Ph.D. Fellowship Awards is an intensely competitive program which honors exceptional Ph.D. students in many academic disciplines and areas of study.

IBM pays special attention to an array of focus areas of interest to IBM and fundamental to innovation, including technology that creates new business value, innovative software, new types of computers and interdisciplinary projects.


Lewis and Tomlinson featured in inaugural issue of International Journal of Learning and Media

photo: bill tomlinson

Bill
Tomlinson

Undergraduate student Lauren Lewis and ICS Professor Bill Tomlinson, along with Education professor Rebecca Black, are currently featured in the inaugural issues of the International Journal of Learning and Media, a MacArthur Foundation/MIT Press journal.

“Let everyone play: An educational perspective on why fan fiction is, or should be, legal” makes a theoretical, legal, and moral proposition that fan fiction, a form of derivative writing based on existing media and popular culture, be considered fair use of copyrighted materials under U.S. copyright law.

Lewis is a second year Computer Science major and helped co-author the publication in the summer of 2008 as a participant in Calit2's Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship in Information Technology (SURF-IT) program.

Tomlinson's research deals with the social impacts of information technologies, in particular regarding environmental issues and interactive education systems. His previous contributions to informatics and computer science are significant in human-computer interaction, interactive animation, autonomous agents, and multi-device systems.

The complete publication can be found online.


Baldi awarded the Grant in Chemical Sciences to support development of Reaction Explorer

photo: pierre baldi

Pierre
Baldi

Chancellor's Professor Pierre Baldi has been awarded a grant in the Special Grant Program in Chemical Sciences by the Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation.

The grant is in support of the development of Reaction Explorer, a new interactive electronic tutorial system for teaching organic reactions, reaction mechanisms, organic synthesis and retrosynthesis at the undergraduate level.

Reaction Explorer is an interactive tutorial system for organic chemistry reactions, which enables students to learn about reactions in ways previously unrealized.

With the Reaction Explorer project, Baldi, together with MD/PhD graduate student Jonathan Chen, aim to provide a richer learning experience including: dynamic generation of customized multi-step synthesis design problems; context-specific feedback messages; and support for inquiry-based learning through experimentation and interactive dialogue with the system.

Baldi’s research focuses in several areas of AI, data mining, machine learning, bioinformatics, and chemoinformatics. Projects in his group include understanding and predicting protein structures, analyzing and modeling gene expression data and regulatory networks, and building expert systems for chemistry and drug discovery.

The purpose of the Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation, Inc., is to advance the science of chemistry, chemical engineering and related sciences as a means of improving human relations and circumstances.

Established in 1946 by chemist, inventor and businessman Camille Dreyfus as a memorial to his brother Henry, the Foundation became a memorial to both men when Camille Dreyfus died in 1956. Throughout its history the Foundation has sought to take the lead in identifying and addressing needs and opportunities in the chemical sciences.


FEBRUARY 2009

Li receives NSF award to study large-scale data cleaning

photo: chen li

Chen
Li

Chen Li, associate professor of computer science, has
received an award for $221,730 from the NSF CluE program to support his research on large-scale data cleaning
using cloud computing.

In addition, his team will also use software and services on a Google-IBM cluster to explore innovative research ideas in data-intensive computing.

The project will study research challenges to support efficient data-cleaning queries on large text repositories using the MapReduce/Hadoop parallel computing paradigm.

Supporting such queries is becoming increasingly more important in applications that need to deal with a variety of data inconsistencies in structures, representations, or semantics.

The techniques developed in this project will have a broad impact on many information systems that need to support approximate query processing on large data sets, such as Web search, enterprise search, data integration, and query relaxation.

Li's research interests are in the fields of database and information systems, including data integration and sharing, data warehouses, data cleansing, data privacy, and information management on the Web.


Carey awarded Google Research Award

photo: michael carey

Michael
Carey

Michael Carey, Bren Professor of Information and Computer Sciences, has been awarded a Google Research Award for $70,000 for his research entitled, “A Declarative and Open Source Data Mapping Tool for OpenII.”

Carey’s research is tackling the need for large organizations to effectively access and analyze data coming from disparate sources, including multiple databases, legacy information stores, applications and data stores published via Web services, XML files, and CSV files.

This project aims to produce a declarative and open source data-mapping tool for incorporation into the OpenII initiative. The Google OpenII initiative aims to enable such repositories to be put together much more easily than they can be today, creating better quality data that can then be (re)surfaced on the Web and made available to everyone. Areas of potential impact include medical informatics, biology research, and access to many public data sets that are currently disparate.

Carey's research interests are in database systems, information integration, service-oriented computing, middleware, distributed systems, and computer system performance evaluation.

A National Academy of Engineering member, Carey is acknowledged as one of the 50 most influential computer scientists in the world. He is an ACM Fellow and in 2005, he received ACM’s SIGMOD Edgar F. Codd Innovations Award.

He has also has earned two of the most esteemed research publication awards in the field: the Very Large Data Base (VLDB) Conference’s 10-Year Best Paper Award in 1996, and the 2004 Test of Time Paper Award at the ACM SIGMOD International Conference.


Dutt appointed to the ACM Publications Board

photo: nikil dutt

Nikil
Dutt

Nikil Dutt, Chancellor's Professor of Computer Science, has been appointed to the Association of Computing Machinery (ACM) Publications Board for a 3-year term.

ACM is the largest international professional computing society representing the educational and scientific computing community.

ACM provides the computing field's premier Digital Library and serves its members and the computing profession with leading-edge publications, conferences, and career resources.

The ACM Publications Board is responsible for setting publication policy, approving new publications and appointing the Editors-in-Chief of the premier ACM journals and transactions.

Dutt's research interests are in embedded systems, with topics that are at the intersection of compilers, architectures and computer-aided design. His specific focus is on the exploration, evaluation and design of domain-specific embedded systems that span research issues in hardware, software, networked, and ubiquitous systems.

Other projects in his group include brain-inspired computing platforms, low-power/low-energy compilation and synthesis, embedded system validation and verification, and memory architecture exploration for embedded systems.