In the News

September 12, 2016

Alumni success story: Ersin Uzun

Computer Science alumnus named VP, director of PARC’s Computing Science Lab

Computer Science alumnus Ersin Uzun (M.S., Ph.D. ’10) was recently appointed vice president and director of the Xerox PARC’s (Palo Alto Research Center) Computing Science Laboratory (CSL). This is the very same CSL that invented the notions of: GUI, Bitmap Graphics, Ethernet, and Object-Oriented Programming and Ubiquotous Computing.

In this new role, Uzun will lead the research and development of new security and communication technologies, as well as the innovation service offerings such as rapid prototyping, user needs research and innovation management consultancy. “This is a tremendous achievement for someone only six years out of graduate school,” says Chancellor’s Professor of Computer Science Gene Tsudik, who was Uzun’s Ph.D. advisor. “His success is a reflection on the caliber of students graduating from our Computer Science and Networked Systems programs, who are ready to make a difference in the world.”

Uzun has been working at PARC since 2010. He started as a senior research scientist before going on to direct PARC’s research efforts in data security and privacy, leading some of its visionary research in privacy-preserving analytics, content-centric networking and named-data networking. He then served as PARC’s global director of technology solutions and strategy, leading its efforts in developing innovative and cutting-edge solutions to the industries’ most challenging problems, before being promoted to his current position as VP and CSL director.

Aside from PARC, Uzun’s worked at Nokia Research, HP Labs and Ericsson. His professional experience also includes co-founding hi-tech startups and working as a technology consultant. He is also the author of more than 100 peer-reviewed publications and issued/pending patents.

Learn more and connect with Uzun here >


Alumni success story: Ersin Uzun

< Previous
Bowker awarded two NSF grants for big data research
Next >
ICS study links selfies, happiness