Courses I teach

 

SPRING, 2016

ICS 263: Computerization, Work and Organizations

  1. ICS 263, Syllabus, Spring 2016


This course is intended to generate understanding of the philosophical, theoretical, and empirical foundations of the social study of technology in organizations. The course involves consideration and discussion of the research literature that includes a range of social phenomena surrounding the development, implementation, use, and implications of technology in organizations. A particular focus of the discussions will be an examination of the research assumptions guiding the theoretical ideas and empirical studies conducted in this field. The readings in this course follow a trajectory from readings that will help us understand research assumptions’ underlying studies in technology and organizations, to a variety of theoretical frameworks applied to studies of technology in organizations and empirical examples of research conducted from the perspective of different research methods/assumptions and theoretical perspectives. This course would be useful for graduate students doing sociological and anthropological work in organizations. Even if one’s research focus does not directly focus on technology more and more core organizational processes and routines happen via information technologies. Therefore, developing frameworks to understand the relationship between technological infrastructure and assumptions and organizational processes is important for scholars across disciplinary traditions.


1cS 207S: Doctoral Research and Writing Seminar

ICS 207S, Overview, Spring 2016

The goal of the seminar is to provide students with milestones for getting some sort of 'product' out to the group and a rhythm for writing and thinking. It also engenders shared understanding of what your colleagues' are engaged in and hopefully becomes a site for productive cross-over in ideas, literature, and writing tips. This workshop is geared toward students that are actively working on their own work and research stream.  


FALL, 2015

1cS 201: Research and Methods for Informatics

  1. 201 SYLLABUS, Fall 2015


Informatics 201 is a PhD level course designed to introduce you to being a successful researcher in HCI, CSCW, Ubicomp, STS, Organizations and other related Informatics disciplines. This course will provide you the tools you need to dive into research with your primary advisor. Discussion is required as well as bringing in other experiences from meeting with your advisors, working with fellow graduate students, former courses at other institutions, industrial experience, and more.


In this course we will provide an overview of research methods and theoretical inquiry. It does not deal with specific techniques per se, but rather with the assumptions and the logic underlying social research. Further we will go over some of the primary communication and writing genres necessary for a successful academic career. (research paper, review).


In this course I aim for a balance between lecture and discussion. Active class interaction is critical. Readings have been selectively chosen to stimulate rich discussion. Students are expected to take the time to read thoroughly and with a critical perspective. Everyone is expected to come to class fully prepared to discuss all readings. Class participation grades will be allocated on the basis of both the quality and quantity of contributions both online and in class.


WINTER & SPRING, 2015

1cS 207S: Doctoral Research and Writing Seminar


Spring, 2014

ICS 263: Computerization, Work and Organizations


1cS 207S: Doctoral Research and Writing Seminar


Winter, 2014

1cS 207S: Doctoral Research and Writing Seminar


Spring, 2013

1cS 295: Materialities of Information (with Paul Dourish)

  1. COURSE WEBSITE - housed on Paul Dourish’s webpage

The goal of this class is to bring recent interests arising in anthropology, science studies, media studies, and organization studies in the topic of materiality into conversation with informatics and the study of the digital. The key insight that we would like to develop is that the "materiality of information" goes beyond an interest in the artifacts of information infrastructure but has insight to offer too for the constitution and consequences of digitality.

Together, we will explore a range of perspectives on the materiality of information, including questions of material culture, digital representational practice, the informational substrate, networks and spatially, and the infrastructure of digital political economy. We will do this by reading both instructor-selected and student-select materials in juxtaposition, hoping for a broad and productive interdisciplinary engagement.


Fall, 2012

1cS 161: Social Analysis of Computerization

  1. ICS 161 SYLLABUS, Fall 2012

  2. technology disconnect assignment

  3. FInal video and flyer project

Website (must have a UCI ID to access)

This course is a broad introduction of computerization as a social process. It examines the social opportunities and problems raised by new information technologies, and the consequences of different ways of organizing. You will learn to do a socio-technical historical analysis that analyzes the stakeholders, expected outcomes, and unexpected consequences that emerge as new technologies affect social structures and daily experience. Topics include: computerization as providing new ways of “seeing”; information archiving, search and locating; privacy; environmental implications of IT; the ‘self’ in a connected world; financial markets in the information age; community based research and informatics; and games and virtual worlds.


fall, 2011

1cS 161: Social Analysis of Computerization

ICS 161 SYLLABUS, Fall 2011

Website (must have a UCI ID to access)

This course is a broad introduction of computerization as a social process. It examines the social opportunities and problems raised by new information technologies, and the consequences of different ways of organizing. You will learn to do a socio-technical historical analysis that analyzes the stakeholders, expected outcomes, and unexpected consequences that emerge as new technologies affect social structures and daily experience. Topics include: computerization as providing new ways of “seeing”; information archiving, search and locating; privacy; environmental implications of IT; the ‘self’ in a connected world; financial markets in the information age; community based research and informatics; and games and virtual worlds.


1cS 207: Research and Writing Seminar


Spring, 2011

ICS 163: Projects in the Social and Organizational Implications of Technologies-in-Use

ICS 163 SYLLABUS, Spring 2011

Website (must have a UCI ID to access)

The objective of the course is to provide practical experience in researching social and organizational implications of technology. Emphasis will be placed on conducting ethnographic research, writing, and presenting. You will be part of a team project analyzing organizational process and technology-in-use at a local business, non-profit organization or service at UCI.

First, you will learn about how to design an empirical study.  Even though, you have learned some of this in 161 and 162, this practicum will help you engage that material in the empirical world.
What question are you trying to answer?  How should you go about attempting to answer these questions?  What other factors do you need to consider when engaging in empirical research? 


Second, you will learn how to gather data about people’s social and cultural environments.

Techniques will include observing social dynamics, interviewing people, and analyzing technologies-in-use. We will also discuss other techniques such as organizational documents, artifact analysis, and journals and logs. For each technique you will learn what types of question it can answer, how to go about using it, and how does it influence your study design.


Third, you will learn how to analyze the data that you collect.
Analysis is the process of taking the data that you gather and turning into a systematic set of findings that let you make claims. For example, analysis lets you say how and why an organizational process is effective or ineffective for the users or whether software needs to work a certain way in order to meet the needs of potential users. We will learn how to perform analysis on the types of data that you’ve just learned how to collect.


The goal of this class is to provide you with an introduction to how to use empirical methods and engage in data analysis to provide insight into organizational processes and technologies in-use.

At the end of this class you should be able to design a study that allows you to take a research question and answer it using appropriate data collection and analysis techniques.


1cS 161: Social Analysis of Computerization

ICS 161 SYLLABUS, Spring 2011


Winter, 2011

ICS 263: Computerization, Work and Organizations

ICS 263 SYLLABUS, Winter 2011


SPRING, 2010

ICS 161: Social Analysis of Computerization


ICS 295: The connected, mediated and wired self: Exploring social identity in the information age

ICS 295 SYLLABUS, Spring 2010


This seminar asks students to explore how they develop, maintain, and assert a sense of themselves through ongoing interactions. This course will rely on course readings, active discussion, and a collective interview project to evoke questions about who we are - and are able to be - in an increasingly technologically mediated social environment. This seminar is intended to generate understandings of the origins of symbolic interactionist, social identity, and social constructivist theories of the self, and inspire questions about how these perspectives translate into the current era of pervasive communication and information saturation (graduate).