Richard E. Pattis
Senior Lecturer
Department of Computer Science
and
Department of Informatics
Donald Bren School of Information
  and Computer Sciences
University of California, Irvine
Irvine, CA 92697
pattis@ics.uci.edu
Office: 4062 Bren Hall
Phone: (949) 824-2704
Fax:     (949) 824-4056

See Inversions, a book by Scott Kim


I have put my collection of Quotations for Learning and Programing on the web. I hope to continue expanding
(and correcting) it. I always welcome feedback (e.g., corrections, misattributions, other quotations).


I am starting to index, annotate, and put on the web various Education-Related Video Clips.


Fall 2014 Teaching Schedule

Information and Computer Sciences (ICS) 33: Intermediate Programming
Final Exam: Friday, Dec 19, 1:30pm - 3:30pm
(closed book/closed notes/closed computer/closed calculator)

Information and Computer Sciences (ICS) 46: Data Structure Implementation and Analysis
Final Exam: Friday, Dec 19, 8:00am - 10:00am
(closed book/closed notes/closed computer/closed calculator)

Information and Computer Sciences (ICS) 90: New Student Seminar
No Final Exam

Information and Computer Sciences (ICS) 193: Tutoring in ICS
No Final Exam

I'll be in class (lecture/yellow) and will hold office hours (gray) most days. I have online office hours using AIM every weekday evening
on a day before class meets.

Please note that my office hours are open. There is no need to schedule an appointment ahead of time. Just drop by.

If you want debugging help during my office hours, please ensure that your programming project loaded on your portable computer
(or is loadable on my computer, if we need to use it for debugging).

Time/DayMondayTuesdayWednesdayThursdayFridaySunday
11:00-11:30 Lecture: ICS 46
RH 101
 
 
Lecture: ICS 46
RH 101
 
 
Lecture: ICS 46
RH 101
 
 
11:30-12:00 Lecture: ICS 46
RH 101
 
 
Lecture: ICS 46
RH 101
 
 
Lecture: ICS 46
RH 101
 
 
12:00-12:30 Office Hours
DBH 4062
 
 
Office Hours*
DBH 4062
 
 
Office Hours
DBH 4062
 
 
12:30-  1:00 Office Hours
DBH 4062
 
 
Office Hours*
DBH 4062
 
 
Office Hours
DBH 4062
 
 
  1:00-  1:30  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  1:30-  2:00  
 
Office Hours
DBH 4062
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  2:00-  2:30 Lecture: ICS 33
ELH 100
Office Hours
DBH 4062
Lecture: ICS 33
ELH 100
 
 
Lecture: ICS 33
ELH 100
 
 
  2:30-  3:00 Lecture: ICS 33
ELH 100
Office Hours
DBH 4062
Lecture: ICS 33
ELH 100
 
 
Lecture: ICS 33
ELH 100
 
 
  3:00-  3:30 Office Hours
DBH 4062
Office Hours
DBH 4062
Office Hours
DBH 4062
 
 
Staff Meeting
 
 
  3:30-  4:00 Office Hours
DBH 4062
Lecture: ICS 193
DBH 5011
Office Hours
DBH 4062
 
 
Staff Meeting
 
 
  4:00-  4:30  
 
Lecture: ICS 193
DBH 5011
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  4:30-  5:00  
 
Lecture: ICS 193
DBH 5011
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  5:00-  5:30     Lecture: ICS 90
BS3 1200
     
  5:30-  6:00     Lecture: ICS 90
BS3 1200
     
  6:00-  6:30     Lecture: ICS 90
BS3 1200
     
  9:00-10:00
(evenings)
Online Help: AIM
richardepattis
Online: AIM
richardepattis
Online: AIM
richardepattis
Online: AIM
richardepattis
 
 
 
 

For Office Hours* (with a *: W 12pm-1pm) I will sometimes have to cancel because
of faculty meetings. I will send email that day if I cannot attend these office hours.


Interesting Snippets

While developing a manuscript for a textbook on the Ada programming language in the late 1980s, I wrote a chapter on EBNF and began teaching it on the "first" day of my CS-1 class: primarily as a microcosm of programming, but also as a practical tool for later describing the syntax of Ada. These 21 pages (less than 1/4 the size of the original Karel book) discuss the sequence, choice, option, repetition, and recursion control structures (along with "procedural" abstracton via named EBNF rules). They explore various methods of proving that tokens satisfy descriptions, that descriptions are equivalent (and how to simplify them), and the difference between syntax and semantics. I have continued to use this approach until this day in my CS-1 classes. In fact, I have rewritten this EBNF chapter for an introduction to Python course I am teaching.

A short opinion piece on Plagiarism from the NY Times.

A new cure for Short Bowel Syndrome (Brainstorm to Breakthrough: A Surgical Procedure is Born).

An excerpt from the chapter "He Fixes Radios by Thinking!" from the book "Surely You're Joking, Mr. Feynman!": Adventures of a Curious Character (start at the bottom of page 18: "One day I got a telephone call..." and finish at the bottom of page 20: "...never thought that was possible.") Explains why debugging is best accomplished by thinking, not fiddling.

If Charles Schultz wrote Karel the Robot

Arlo and Janis: The hardest teacher

Doonesbury: Walden's Last B

My Favorite Graph: I show this graph (and its associated article) in class after discussing general graph theory terminology (up to connected components). It is scary and compelling at the same time.

De Millo, Lipton, and Perlis: Social Processes and Proofs of Theorems and Programs Communications of the ACM, May 1979; Volume 22, Number 5, Pages 271-280.

Genius is a Thing that Happens from Jordan Ellenberg's How Not to Be Wrong: The Power of Mathematical Thinking. Why Mathematics (and Computer Science) students should not be discouraged by smarter classmates.


Philosphical Musings

Doubts are such tiny things. A mind with no room for doubts must have no room for thoughts either. -R. Pattis


The following dialog is from the transcript of "Between Time and Timbuktu" (a synthesis of the writings of Kurt Vonnegut). For more on Bokononism, from which this passage is inspired, see The Books of Bokonon (from the novel "Cat's Cradle").

Narrator: In the beginning, G-d created the Earth, and he said, "Let there be mud." And there was mud. And G-d said, "Let Us make living creatures out of mud, so the mud can see what We have done." And G-d created every living creature that now moveth, and one was man. Mud-as-man alone could speak. "What is the purpose of all this?" man asked politely. "Everything must have a purpose?" asked G-d. "Certainly," said man. Then I leave it up to you to think of one for all of this," said G-d. And he went away.

Stony Stevenson: I feel very unimportant compared to you [G-d].

Voice of Bokonon: The only way you can feel the least bit important is to think of all the mud that didn't even get to sit up and look around.

SS: I got so much, and most mud got so little.