In the News

June 18, 2018

MIT Technology Review

A machine has figured out Rubik’s Cube all by itself

In chess, by contrast, there is a relatively large search space but each move can be evaluated and rewarded accordingly. That just isn’t the case for the Rubik’s Cube.

Enter Stephen McAleer and colleagues from the University of California, Irvine. These guys have pioneered a new kind of deep-learning technique, called “autodidactic iteration,” that can teach itself to solve a Rubik’s Cube with no human assistance. The trick that McAleer and co have mastered is to find a way for the machine to create its own system of rewards.

Read the full story at MIT Technology Review.
A machine has figured out Rubik’s Cube all by itself


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