UC IRVINE - ICS 125 PROJECT IN SYSTEM DESIGN

ACADEMIC DISHONESTY POLICY

NOTE: This edition published September 1996 ICS Undergraduate Student Affairs Office


The general policies on academic misconduct as outlined in the UCI Academic Senate Policies on Academic Dishonesty apply within the Department. These policies suffice for much of our work, including examinations and written assignments. However, they do not deal explicitly with course work involving computers; thus the policies must be extended to cover those cases. The specific text of UCI's policies may be found in both the UCI General Catalogue and the quarterly Schedule of Classes; this text is also published electronically. Students may also pick up a copy of the brochure entitled "Academic Dishonesty: Responsibilities, Definitions and Procedures" in the UCI Dean of Students' office.

Definition of Cheating

The decision as to whether a student cheated depends on the intent of an assignment, the ground rules specified by the instructor, and the behavior of the student. Two guidelines help an instructor decide if cheating has occurred:

It is unreasonable to expect a complete definition of cheating; each case is important enough to be given careful, individual scrutiny. It is, however, helpful to have guidelines and precedents. Here are some examples of cases which are clearly cheating and clearly not cheating.

Cheating

Not Cheating

Penalties

The procedures that are followed and the sanctions that may be imposed for an incident of academic dishonesty are outlined in the UCI Academic Senate Policies on Academic Dishonesty. The specific text of UCI's policies may be found in both the UCI General Catalogue and the quarterly Schedule of Classes; this text is also published electronically. Students may also pick up a copy of the brochure entitled "Academic Dishonesty: Responsibilities, Definitions and Procedures" in the UCI Dean of Students'office.

Students should be aware that an incident of academic dishonesty may be sufficient to cause dismissal from the ICS major, denial of a petition to change majors into ICS, or denial of admission into the ICS Honors Program.

Students should also be aware that a recorded incident of academic dishonesty will disqualify them for consideration for honors at graduation.

In the event that an instructor accuses a student of academic dishonesty and imposes a penalty, the student may prepare a statement giving hislher side of the case for inclusion in the student's file.

NOTE: Disciplinary procedures and sanctions will be consistent with those in the UCI implementation of "Interim Policies and Procedures Applying to Campus Activities, Organizations, and Students, Part A."


ICS125 WQ00
David F. Redmiles Home Page
Department of Information and Computer Science
University of California, Irvine CA 92717-3425